The Object Teams Blog

Adding team spirit to your objects.

Mix-n-match language support

leave a comment »

I’ve been involved in the release of different versions of the JDT lately, supporting different flavors of Java.

Classical release management

At the core we have the plain JDT, of which we published the 3.7.0 release in June and right now first release candidates are being prepared towards the 3.7.1 service release, which will be the first official release to support Java 7. At the same time the first milestones towards 3.8 are being built. OK, this is almost normal business — with the exception of the service release differs more than usual from its base release, due to the unhappy timing of the release of Java 7 vs. Eclipse 3.7.

So that’s 3 versions in 2 month’s time.

First variant: Object Teams

The same release plan is mirrored by the Object Teams releases 2.0.0, 2.0.1RC1, 2.1.0M1. Merging the delta from JDT 3.7 to 3.7.1 into the OTDT was a challenge, given that this delta contained the full implementation of all that’s new in Java 7. Still with the experience of regularly merging JDT/Core changes into the OT variant, the pure merging was less than one day plus a couple more days until all 50000+ tests were green again. The nice thing about the architecture of the OTDT: after merging the JDT/Core, I was done. Since all other adaptations of the JDT are implemented using OT/Equinox adopting, e.g., all the new quick assists for Java 7 required a total of zero minutes integration time.

I took the liberty of branching 2.0.x and 2.1 only after integrating the Java 7 support, which also means that 2.1 M1 has only a small number of OT-specific improvements that did not already go into 2.0.1.

This gives 6 versions of the JDT in 2 month’s time.

Prototyping annotation based null analysis

As I wrote before, I’m preparing a comprehensive new feature for the JDT/Core: static analysis for potential NullPointerException based on annotations in the code. The latest patch attached to the bug had almost 3000 lines. Recent discussions at ECOOP made me change my mind in a few questions, so I changed some implementation strategies. Luckily the code is well modularized due to the use of OT/Equinox.

Now came the big question: against which version of the JDT should I build the null-annotation add-on? I mean, which of the 6 versions I have been involved in during the last 2 months?

As I like a fair challenge every now and then I decided: all six, i.e., I wanted to support adding the new static analysis to all six JDT versions mentioned before.

Integration details

Anybody who has worked on a Java compiler will confirm: if you change one feature of the compiler chances are that any other feature can be broken by the change (I’m just paraphrasing: “it’s complex”). And indeed, applying the nullity plug-in to the OTDT caused some headache at first, because both variants of the compiler make specific assumptions about the order in which specific information is available during the compilation process. It turned out that two of these assumptions where simply incompatible, so I had to make some changes (here I made the null analysis more robust).

At the point where I thought I was done, I tripped over an ugly problem that’s intrinsic to Java.
The nullity plug-in adapts a method in the JDT/Core which contains the following switch statement:

        while ((token = this.scanner.getNextToken()) != TerminalTokens.TokenNameEOF) {
                IExtendedModifier modifier = null;
                switch(token) {
                        case TerminalTokens.TokenNameabstract:
                                modifier = createModifier(Modifier.ModifierKeyword.ABSTRACT_KEYWORD);
                                break;
                        case TerminalTokens.TokenNamepublic:
                                modifier = createModifier(Modifier.ModifierKeyword.PUBLIC_KEYWORD);
                                break;
                        // more cases
                }
        }
 

I have a copy of this method where I only added a few lines to one of the case blocks.
Compiles fine against any version of the JDT. But Eclipse hangs when I install this plugin on top of a wrong JDT version. What’s wrong?

The problem lies in the (internal) interface TerminalTokens. The required constants TokenNameabstract etc. are of course present in all versions of this interface, however the values of these constants change every time the parser is generated anew. If constants were really abstractions that encapsulate their implementation values, all would be fine, but the Java byte code knows nothing about such an abstraction, all constant values are inlined during compilation. In other words: the meaning of a constant depends solely on the definitions which the compiler sees during compilation. Thus compiling the above switch statement hardcodes a dependency on one particular version of the interface TerminalTokens. BAD.

After recognizing the problem, I had to copy some different versions of the interface into my plug-in, implement some logic to translate between the different encodings and that problem was solved.

What’s next?

Nothing is next. At this point I could apply the nullity plug-in to all six versions of the JDT and all are behaving well.

We indeed have 12 versions of the JDT in 2 month’s time.

Mix-n-match

Would you like Java with our without the version 7 enhancements (stable release or milestone)? May I add some role and team classes? How about a dash more static analysis? It turns out we have more than just one product, we have a full little product line with features to pick or opt-out:

 

Java 6

Java 7
Indigo

Indigo SR1

Juno M1
no null annotations

Plain JDT

 

 

 
OTDT

 

 

 
with null annotations

Plain JDT

 

 

 
OTDT

 

 

 

Just make your choice 🙂
Happy hacking with null annotations and try-with-resources in OT/J.

EclipseCon Europe 2011  

BTW: if you want to hear a bit more about the work on null annotations, you should really come to EclipseCon Europe — why not drop a comment at this submission 🙂
Advertisements

Written by Stephan Herrmann

August 19, 2011 at 17:22

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: